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NEW YORK STATE
STL

Last update: 2011-11-10


  • Article 1. Short Title 1
  • Article 1-A. Designation of State Capital 1-A
  • Article 2. State Boundaries 2 - 10
  • Article 3. Cessions to the United States 20 - 38
  • Article 4. Purchase and Acquisition of Land by the United States 50 - 57-A
  • Article 4-A. Acquisition of Land for Public Defense 58 - 59-H
  • Article 4-B. Acquisition of Land by the United Nations 59-I - 59-L
  • Article 5. Entry Upon Lands for Purposes of United States Survey 60
  • Article 6. Arms and Great Seal of State 70 - 88
  • Article 7. Congressional Districts 110 - 112
  • Article 8. Assembly and Senate Districts of the State
    • Title 1. Assembly Districts 120 - 122
    • Title 2. Senate Districts 123 - 125
    • Title 3. Miscellaneous 126 - 128
  • Article 10. Laws Repealed; When to Take Effect 170 - 171

Article 1
Short Title

Section 1. Short title.

This chapter shall be known as the "State Law."

Article 1-A
Designation of State Capital

Section 1-A. State capital.

The capital city of the state of New York is hereby designated to be the city of Albany.

Article 2
State Boundaries

Section 2. Connecticut boundary line.

The boundary line between the states of New York and Connecticut is as follows:

Commencing at a granite monument (No. 1), at the northwest corner of the state of Connecticut, marking the corner of Massachusetts, New York and Connecticut, in latitude 42° 02' 58" .427 and longitude 73° 29' 15" .959; thence south 2° 42' 30" west 30,569 feet to a granite monument (No. 12) 470 feet south of the Bird Hill road between Millerton and Ore Hill in latitude 41° 57' 56" .772 and longitude 73° 29' 35" .078; thence south 3° 53' 44" west 15,846 feet to a monument (No. 18) in the south side of the highway from Millerton to Sharon along the north shore of Indian Pond in latitude 41° 55' 20" .586 and longitude 73° 29' 49" .318; thence south 2° 47' 51" west 10,681 feet to a monument (No. 21) on the Cliff North of Webatuck creek in latitude 41° 53' 35" .190 and longitude 73° 29' 56" .210; thence south 4° 39' 01" west 10,683 feet to a monument (No. 24) in the rear of R. E. Randall's house on the east road from Sharon Valley to Leedsville in latitude 41° 51' 49" .995 and longitude 73° 30' 07" .652; thence south 3° 49' 10" west 26,405 feet to a monument (No. 32) on the westerly slope of a rocky hillside at the corner of the towns of Sharon and Kent in latitude 41° 47' 29" .709 and longitude 73° 30' 30" .871; thence south 3° 52' 35" west 10,457 feet to a monument (No. 35) on the shoulder of a mountain northeast of Bog Hollow, in latitude 41° 45' 46" .637 and longitude 73° 30' 40" .199; thence south 3° 06' 18" west 16,045 feet to a monument (No. 41) at the easterly edge of a large pasture north of Preston mountain, known as the Chapel lots, in latitude 41° 43' 08" .354 and longitude 73° 30' 51" .658; thence south 3° 57' 03" west 10,657 feet to a monument (No. 45) at the southerly end of Schaghticoke mountain in latitude 41° 41' 23" .320 and longitude 73° 31' 01" .335; thence south 2° 41' 41" west 10,534 feet to a monument (No. 48) on the northwesterly slope of Ten-Mile hill in latitude 41° 39' 39" .359 and longitude 73° 31' 07" .860; thence south 3° 31' 33" west 21,140 feet to a monument (No. 55) at the northerly end of a rocky hill about a mile south of the northeast corner of the town of Pawling, New York, in latitude 41° 36' 10" .894 and longitude 73° 31' 24" .972; thence south 4° 24' 52" west 10,785 feet to a monument (No. 59) in a field east of a right angle in the road from Quaker Hill to Sherman in latitude 41° 34' 24" .659 and longitude 73° 31' 35" .893; thence south 3° 52' 52" west 10,520 feet to a monument (No. 64) on a ledge falling southwest to a brook in the southwestern part of the town of Sherman in latitude 41° 32' 40" .963 and longitude 73° 31' 45" .257; thence south 4° 28' 48" west 10,410 feet to a monument (No. 68) on Cranberry mountain in latitude 41° 30' 58" .424 and longitude 73° 31' 55" .946; thence south 2° 24' 38" west 10,617 feet to a monument (No. 72) on the northerly slope of a hill a mile south of Haviland Hollow in latitude 41° 29' 13" .627 and longitude 73° 32' 01" .813; thence south 3° 03' 12" west 20,731 feet to a monument (No. 80) in a mowed field southeast of an angle in the road from Brewster to Ball pond in latitude 41° 25' 49" .108 and longitude 73° 32' 16" .309; thence south 4° 53' 12" west 10,279 feet to a monument (No. 84) on the northerly side of a rocky summit northwest of Mill Plain in latitude 41° 24' 07" .915 and longitude 73° 32' 27" .798; thence south 2° 45' 48" west 10,527 feet to a monument (No. 89) in a swampy pasture south of a right angle in a back road which runs along the line between the towns of Danbury and Ridgefield in latitude 41° 22' 24" .030 and longitude 73° 32' 34" .456; thence south 4° 36' 39" west 10,878 feet to a monument (No. 91) in a swamp near Mopus brook in latitude 41° 20' 36" .900 and longitude 73° 32' 45" .920; thence south 4° 12' 16" west 10,493 feet to a monument (No. 96) south of a ledge on Titicus mountain in latitude 41° 18' 53" .507 and longitude 73° 32' 56" .001; thence south 6° 32' 21" west 7,214 feet to a monument (No. 98) known as the Ridgefield angle on a steep side hill sloping toward south pond in latitude 41° 17' 42" .690 and longitude 73° 33' 06" .764; thence south 32° 46' 06" east 14,109 feet to a monument (No. 103) in a swamp near a small brook in latitude 41° 15' 45" .460 and longitude 73° 31' 26" .775; thence south 32° 41' 46" east 10,443 feet to a monument (No. 106) at the westerly side of a rocky ridge near the southwest corner of Ridgefield in latitude 41° 14' 18" .626 and longitude 73° 30' 12" .940; thence south 32° 02' 28" east 11,047 feet to a monument (No. 109) known as the Wilton angle in woodland northwest of Bald Hill in latitude 41° 12' 46" .101 and longitude 73° 28' 56" .263; thence south 59° 59' 58" west 9,588 feet to a monument (No. 112) on the south side of a short cross road leading west from the Vista road in latitude 41° 11' 58" .721 and longitude 73° 30' 44" .877; thence south 57° 58' 49" west 6,002 feet to a monument (No. 115) on the northeasterly slope of a low, wooded hill one-half mile west of Mud pond and northeast of Sellick's Corners in latitude 41° 11' 27" .272 and longitude 73° 31' 51" .438; thence south 59° 09' 58" west 15,983 feet to a monument (No. 120) on the summit of a rocky ridge half way between two large swamps, northeast of long ridge in latitude 41° 10' 06" .294 and longitude 73° 34' 50" .871; thence south 58° 56' 22" west 21,193 feet to a monument (No. 127) in level woodland west of a low hill west of Banksville in latitude 41° 08' 18" .189 and longitude 73° 38' 48" .129; thence south 58° 32' 47" west 26,355 feet to a rough granite monument (No. 140) known as the Duke's Trees angle, set in concrete with its top below the roadway called King street in latitude 41° 06' 02" .205 and longitude 73° 43' 41" .778; thence south 31° 29' 41" east 11,440 feet to a monument (No. 148) 300 feet north of the road leading west from King street south of Rye lake in latitude 41° 04' 25" .814 and longitude 73° 42' 23" .747; thence south 32° 10' 57" east 14,975 feet to a monument (No. 153) at the east side of King street 1,000 feet north of Ridge street in latitude 41° 02' 20" .570 and longitude 73° 40' 39" .666; thence south 32° 07' 30" east 11,461 feet to a granite monument (No. 158) set at the north side of Byram bridge in a concrete pier on a granite ledge known since 1684 as the Great Stone at the wading place in latitude 41° 00' 44" .662 and longitude 73° 39' 20" .172; thence south 9° 53' 43" west 835 feet to a brass bolt and plate (No. 159) set in the top of a large boulder in Byram river in latitude 41° 00' 36" .535 and longitude 73° 39' 22" .044; thence south 18° 56' 41" west 3,735 feet to angle No. 161 in Byram river in latitude 41° 00' 1" .626 and longitude 73° 39' 37" .863, this tangent being produced and referenced on the shore by a brass bolt and plate leaded into the rock on a steep hill; thence south 12° 57' 02" east 965 feet to angle No. 162 in Byram river in latitude 40° 59' 52" .335 and longitude 73° 39' 35" .044, the line being produced and referenced by a bolt and plate in the rock on a hill east of the river; thence south 5° 14' 08" west 950 feet to angle No. 163 in Byram river in latitude 40° 59' 42" .995 and longitude 73° 39' 36" .173, the line being produced and referenced by a bolt and plate in the ledge on the west shore of the river; thence south 9° 10' 19" east 692 feet to angle No. 164 in Byram river in latitude 40° 59' 36" .249 and longitude 73° 39' 34" .736, the line being produced and referenced by a bolt and plate in the shore; thence south 34° 35' 04" east 684 feet to angle No. 165 in Byram river in latitude 40° 59' 30" .682 and longitude 73° 39' 29" .671, both ends of this and the three subsequent tangents being produced and referenced by brass bolts and plates set in the ledge on the shore of the river; thence south 26° 00' 02" east 229 feet to angle No. 166 in latitude 40° 59' 28" .646 and longitude 73° 39' 28" .360; thence south 5° 26' 38" west 402 feet to angle No. 167 in latitude 40° 59' 24" .694 and longitude 73° 39' 28" .857; thence south 50° 49' 51" west 815 feet to angle No. 168 in latitude 40° 59' 19" .608 and longitude 73° 39' 37" .096; thence south 30° 01' 41" east 1,924 feet to angle No. 169, a point in the center of the channel in line with the breakwater at Lyon's or Byram point in latitude 40° 59' 03" .152 and longitude 73° 39' 24" .546, the northerly end of this tangent being produced back and referenced by a brass bolt and plate in the ledge overlooking the harbor; thence south 45° east 17,160 feet or three and one-quarter miles to angle No. 170 in latitude 40° 57' 03" .228 and longitude 73° 36' 46" .418, the first angle point in Long Island sound described by the joint commissioners of New York and Connecticut by a memorandum of agreement dated December eighth, eighteen hundred and seventy-nine; thence in a straight line (the arc of a great circle) north 74° 32' 32" east 434,394 feet to a point (No. 171) in latitude 41° 15' 31" .321 and longitude 72° 05' 24" .685, four statute miles true south of New London lighthouse; thence north 58° 58' 43" east 22,604 feet to a point (No. 172) in latitude 41° 17' 26" .341 and longitude 72° 01' 10" .937, marked on the United States coast survey chart of Fisher's Island sound annexed to said memorandum,--- which point is on the Long east 3/4 north sailing course drawn on said map 1,000 feet true north from the Hammock or North Dumpling lighthouse; thence following said east 3/4 north sailing course north 73° 37' 42" east 25,717 feet to a point (No. 173) in latitude 41° 18' 37" .835 and longitude 71° 55' 47" .626, marked No. 2 on said map; thence south 70° 07' 26" east 6,424 feet toward a point marked No. 3 on said map until said line intersects the westerly boundary of Rhode Island at a point (No. 174) in latitude 41° 18' 16" .249 and longitude 71° 54' 28" .477 as determined by the joint commissioners of Connecticut and Rhode Island by a memorandum of agreement dated March twenty-fifth, eighteen hundred and eighty-seven.

The geodetic positions given in this description are based on Clark's spheroid of eighteen hundred and sixty-six and the astronomical data adopted by the United States coast and geodetic survey in eighteen hundred and eighty and are computed from data given in appendix number eight to the report of the said survey for eighteen hundred and eighty-eight, entitled "Geographical Positions in the State of Connecticut."

The boundary line hereinbefore described and determined which has been located and defined as, and in the manner, provided by section eight of this chapter is fully and accurately laid down on duplicate maps, one copy of which has been deposited with the secretary of state of the state of New York and the other copy thereof with the secretary of state of the state of Connecticut.

Nothing herein contained shall be construed to affect any existing titles to property, corporeal or incorporeal, held under grants heretofore made by either of said states, nor to affect existing rights which said states or either of them or which the citizens of either of said states may have by grant, letters-patent or prescription of fishing in the waters of said sound, whether for shell or floating fish irrespective of the boundary line hereby established, it not being the purpose hereof to define, limit or interfere with any such right, rights or privileges whatever the same may be.

The governor is authorized and requested to transmit a copy of this act to the governor of the state of Connecticut, and upon receiving acknowledgment of its receipt by the state of Connecticut the governor of this state shall cause such acknowledgment to be filed in the office of the secretary of state.

The governor of this state is authorized in concurrence with the governor of the state of Connecticut to communicate to congress the action of the two states on this subject and to request the approval of congress of the boundaries thus established and monumented.

Section 3. Massachusetts boundary line.

The boundary line between the states of New York and Massachusetts is as follows: Beginning at bound one, a granite monument set in ledge on the side of a wooded mountain peak six hundred and nine feet east of Ryan bush road, in latitude forty-two degrees two minutes fifty-eight and four hundred and twenty-seven thousandths seconds north of the equator, and longitude seventy-three degrees twenty-nine minutes fifteen and nine hundred and fifty-nine thousandths seconds west from Greenwich, and marking the northwest corner of Connecticut, a corner of the commonwealth of Massachusetts, and a corner of the state of New York; thence on an azimuth of ninety degrees forty-three minutes forty-nine seconds twenty-six hundred and twenty-four feet to bound three, a granite monument set in ledge on the steep westerly slope of a wooded mountain, in latitude forty-two degrees two minutes fifty-eight and seven hundred and fifty-six thousandths seconds and longitude seventy-three degrees twenty-nine minutes and fifty and seven hundred and thirty-seven thousandths seconds, at the southwest corner of Massachusetts, also in the eastern line of New York and marking a corner of the towns of Mount Washington in Massachusetts, and Ancram and northeast in New York; thence on an azimuth of one hundred and sixty-seven degrees eight minutes fifteen seconds, thirteen thousand six hundred and forty-nine feet to bound nine, a granite monument set in ledge on the westerly wooded slope of Alandar mountain about a quarter of a mile west of its summit, in latitude forty-two degrees five minutes ten and two hundred and five thousandths seconds and longitude seventy-three degrees thirty minutes thirty-one and thirty-one thousandths seconds, at the corner of Mount Washington in Massachusetts and Copake in New York; thence on an azimuth of one hundred and ninety-five degrees twelve minutes twenty-two seconds, two hundred forty-nine thousand two hundred and forty-six feet, by the towns of Mount Washington, Egremont, Alford, West Stockbridge, Richmond, Hancock and Williamstown in Massachusetts, and Copake, Hillsdale, Austerlitz, Canaan, New Lebanon, Stephentown, Berlin and Petersburg in New York, to bound one hundred and twelve, a granite monument set in ledge and earth on an open easterly slope about seventy-five feet west of a private roadway, in latitude forty-two degrees forty-four minutes forty-five and two hundred and one thousandths seconds and longitude seventy three degrees fifteen minutes fifty-four and nine hundred and four thousandths seconds, at the northwest corner of Massachusetts, also in the east line of New York and in the south line of Vermont, and marking a corner in the boundaries of the towns of Williamstown in Massachusetts, Petersburg in New York, and Pownal in Vermont. The term "azimuth," as used in this description, is the angle which a line makes at its point of beginning with the true meridian, reckoning from the south around by the west. In addition to the monuments at the ends of the above mentioned straight lines other monuments have been set at the points of intersection of the above described straight lines with highways, railroads and boundary lines of three towns in New York and seven towns in Massachusetts; also at mile points, excepting the twenty-second and twenty-third miles, which are unmarked. These additional marks are described as follows: Beginning at the said northwest corner of Connecticut; thence westerly about six hundred and nine feet to a monument on the west side of Ryan Bush road; thence westerly about two thousand and fifteen feet to bound three, at the southwest corner of Massachusetts previously described; thence northwesterly about twenty-six hundred and fifty-six feet to a monument marking the first mile point; thence northwesterly about forty-eight hundred and fifty-five feet to a monument on the north side of the Roberts road; thence northwesterly about three hundred and thirty feet to a monument at the corner of Ancram, Copake and Mount Washington; thence northwesterly about ninety-five feet to a monument marking the second mile point; thence northwesterly about fifty-two hundred and eighty feet to a monument marking the third mile point; thence northwesterly about four hundred and thirty-three feet to bound nine, on Alandar mountain previously described; thence northerly about thirty-four hundred and eighty-six feet to a monument at the boundary summit of the Bashbish mountain; thence northerly about thirteen hundred and sixty-one feet to a monument marking the fourth mile point; thence northerly about fifty-two hundred and eighty feet to a monument marking the fifth mile point; thence northerly about twelve hundred and nineteen feet to a monument on the north side of the Bashbish road; thence northerly about twenty-five hundred and seventy-six feet to a monument at the boundary summit of Cedar mountain; thence northerly about fourteen hundred and eighty-five feet to a monument marking the sixth mile point; thence northerly about twenty-eight hundred and forty-eight feet to a monument at the boundary summit of Dugway hill; thence northerly about nine hundred and eighty-five feet to a monument on the north side of the Mount Washington-Hillsdale road; thence northerly about fourteen hundred and forty-seven feet to a monument marking the seventh mile point; thence northerly about six hundred and seventy-seven feet to a monument at the boundary summit of Mount Prospect; thence northerly about forty-five hundred and ninety-four feet to a monument at the corner of Copake, Egremont and Mount Washington; thence northerly about nine feet to a monument marking the eighth mile point; thence northerly about nine hundred and seventy feet to a monument at the boundary summit of Mount Fray; thence northerly about forty-three hundred and ten feet to a monument marking the ninth mile point; thence northerly about fourteen hundred and fifty-nine feet to a monument on the north side of the Hillsdale-South Egremont road; thence northerly about four hundred and seventy-eight feet to a monument at the corner of Copake, Egremont and Hillsdale; thence northerly about thirty-three hundred and forty-three feet to a monument marking the tenth mile point; thence northerly about twenty-seven hundred and eighty-six feet to a monument on the north side of the Hillsdale-North Egremont road; thence northerly about twenty-four hundred and ninety-four feet to a monument marking the eleventh mile point; thence northerly about forty-four hundred and eight feet to a monument on the south side of the North Egremont-North Hillsdale road; thence northerly about eight hundred and seventy-two feet to a monument marking the twelfth mile point; thence northerly about twenty-five hundred and forty-three feet to a monument at the corner of Alford, Egremont and Hillsdale; thence northerly about three hundred and seventy-three feet to a monument on the north side of the Whites Hill road; thence northerly about twenty-three hundred and sixty-four feet to a monument marking the thirteenth mile point; thence northerly about thirty-eight hundred and ninety-three feet to a monument on the south side of the Green River-North Egremont road; thence northerly about thirteen hundred and eighty-seven feet to a monument marking the fourteenth mile point; thence northerly about twenty-three hundred and five feet to a monument on the north side of the Green River-Great Barrington road; thence northerly about twenty-five hundred and thirty-two feet to a monument on the south side of a road; thence northerly about four hundred and forty-three feet to a monument marking the fifteenth mile point; thence northerly about thirty-five hundred and twenty-seven feet to a monument at a boundary summit; thence northerly about seventeen hundred and fifty-three feet to a monument marking the sixteenth mile point; thence northerly about fourteen hundred and ninety-four feet to a monument on the north side of the Alford-Green River road; thence northerly about thirty-four hundred and fifty-six feet to a monument on the north side of a road; thence northerly about three hundred and thirty feet to a monument marking the seventeenth mile point; thence northerly about fifty-two hundred and eighty feet to a monument marking the eighteenth mile point; thence northerly about five hundred and fifty-three feet to a monument at the corner of Alford, Austerlitz and West Stockbridge; thence northerly about forty-seven hundred and twenty-seven feet to a monument marking the nineteenth mile point; thence northerly about fifteen hundred and ninety feet to a monument at the boundary summit of Mount Harvey; thence northerly about thirty-six hundred and ninety feet to a monument marking the twentieth mile point; thence northerly about twenty-nine hundred and two feet to a monument on the south side of the Austerlitz-West Stockbridge south road; thence northerly about three hundred and twenty-seven feet to a monument on the south side of a road; thence northerly about two thousand and eight feet to a monument on the south side of the Austerlitz-West Stockbridge north road; thence northerly about forty-three feet to a monument marking the twenty-first mile point; thence northerly about twenty-six hundred and thirty-five feet to a monument on the north side of a road; thence northerly about twenty-four hundred and nine feet to a monument on the south side of the Canaan-West Stockbridge road; thence northerly about one hundred and fifteen feet to a monument on the Boston and Albany railroad; thence northerly about one hundred and sixty-six feet to a monument on the north side of the Canaan-Richmond Furnace south road; thence northerly about three hundred and ninety-one feet to a monument at the corner of Canaan, Richmond and West Stockbridge; thence northerly about forty-eight hundred and thirty-four feet to a monument on the south side of the Canaan-Richmond Furnace north road; thence northerly about eight hundred and twenty feet to a monument on the east side of the Cunningham Hill road; thence northerly about eight hundred and ninety-seven feet to a monument at the boundary summit of Cunningham hill; thence northerly about thirty-five hundred and seventy-three feet to a monument marking the twenty-fourth mile point; thence northerly about one hundred and sixty-seven feet to a monument on the south side of the Canaan-Richmond road; thence northerly about twenty-eight hundred and thirteen feet to a monument on the west side of a road; thence northerly about twelve hundred and eighty-five feet to a monument on the south side of the Canaan-Pittsfield road; thence northerly about one thousand and fifteen feet to a monument marking the twenty-fifth mile point; thence northerly about fifty-two hundred and eighty feet to a monument marking the twenty-sixth mile point; thence northerly about fifty-two hundred and eighty feet to a monument marking the twenty-seventh mile point; thence northerly about eighteen hundred and ninety-nine feet to a monument at the corner of Canaan, Hancock and Richmond, on Perry's Peak; thence northerly about thirty-three hundred and eighty-one feet to a monument marking the twenty-eighth mile point; thence northerly about seventeen hundred and ninety-two feet to a monument on the south side of the Mount Lebanon-Pittsfield road; thence northerly about eighty feet to a monument on the north side of the Mount Lebanon-Pittsfield road; thence northerly about thirty-three hundred and twenty-four feet to a monument on the north side of the state highway between Pittsfield and New Lebanon; thence northerly about eighty-four feet to a monument marking the twenty-ninth mile point; thence northerly about thirty-three hundred and fifteen feet to a monument at the boundary summit of Mount Lebanon; thence northerly about nineteen hundred and sixty-five feet to a monument marking the thirtieth mile point; thence northerly about fifty-two hundred and eighty feet to a monument marking the thirty-first mile point; thence northerly about two hundred and fifty-six feet to a monument on the north side of the Old Lebanon Springs-Pittsfield road; thence northerly about eleven hundred and eight feet to a monument on the south side of the Lebanon Springs-Pittsfield road; thence northerly about thirty-nine hundred and sixteen feet to a monument marking the thirty-second mile point; thence northerly about nine hundred and ninety-six feet to a monument at the boundary summit of Clover hill; thence northerly about forty-two hundred and eighty-four feet to a monument marking the thirty-third mile point; thence northerly about twenty-five hundred and fifty-five feet to a monument on the south side of Goodrich Hollow road; thence northerly about twenty-seven hundred and twenty-five feet to a monument marking the thirty-fourth mile point; thence northerly about fifty-two hundred and eighty feet to a monument marking the thirty-fifth mile point; thence northerly about twenty-six hundred and eighty-nine feet to a monument on the north side of the Hancock-Stephentown road; thence northerly about twenty-five hundred and ninety-one feet to a monument marking the thirty-six mile point; thence northerly about fifty-two hundred and eighty feet to a monument marking the thirty-seventh mile point; thence northerly about two thousand and sixty-five feet to a monument at the boundary summit of Rounds mountain; thence northerly about thirty-two hundred and fifteen feet to a monument marking the thirty-eighth mile point; thence northerly about fifty-two hundred and eighty feet to a monument marking the thirty-ninth mile point; thence northerly about fifty-two hundred and eighty feet to a monument marking the fortieth mile point; thence northerly about forty-nine hundred and seventy-four feet to a monument marking the boundary summit of Mount Misery; thence northerly about three hundred and six feet to a monument marking the forty-first mile point; thence northerly about fifty-two hundred and eighty feet to a monument marking the forty-second mile point; thence northerly about nine hundred and seventy-two feet to a monument at the corner of Berlin, Hancock and Williamstown; thence northerly about two thousand and eleven feet to a monument on the north side of the Sweet road; thence northerly about twenty-two hundred and ninety-seven feet to a monument marking the forty-third mile point; thence northerly about fifty-two hundred and eighty feet to a monument marking the forty-fourth mile point, on the north slope of Rhodes Pinnacle; thence northerly about two thousand and fifty-six feet to a monument on the south side of Mills Hollow road; thence northerly about thirty-two hundred and twenty-four feet to a monument marking the forty-fifth mile point; thence northerly about forty-six hundred and two feet to a monument on the north side of the Beebe Hollow road; thence northerly about six hundred and seventy-eight feet to a monument marking the forty-sixth mile point; thence northerly about twenty-one hundred and seventy feet to a monument at the boundary summit of Berlin mountain; thence northerly about thirty-one hundred and ten feet to a monument marking the forty-seventh mile point; thence northerly about sixteen hundred and thirty-five feet to a monument on the north side of the Berlin-Williamstown road; thence northerly about thirty-six hundred and forty-five feet to a monument marking the forty-eighth mile point; thence northerly about thirty-four hundred and sixty-three feet to a monument on the south side of the South Williamstown-Petersburg road; thence northerly about three hundred and seven feet to a monument on the north side of the Williamstown-Petersburg road; thence northerly about fifteen hundred and ten feet to a monument marking the forty-ninth mile point; thence northerly about thirty-one hundred and twenty-seven feet to a monument at the boundary summit of Jim Smith hill; thence northerly about twenty-one hundred and fifty-three feet to a monument marking the fiftieth mile point; thence northerly about fifteen hundred and nineteen feet to bound one hundred and twelve, at the northwest corner of Massachusetts, previously described; thereby including within the state of New York that portion of the former territory of Massachusetts known as the district of Boston Corner, situate formerly in the southwesterly corner of Massachusetts, and westerly of the southwest line of the town of Mount Washington, in the county of Berkshire, and ceded to the state of New York upon certain conditions by an act of the legislature of Massachusetts passed on May fourteen, eighteen hundred and fifty-three, entitled "An act relating to the separation of the district of Boston Corner from this commonwealth, and the cession of the same to the state of New York." The acceptance by this state of sovereignty and jurisdiction of such ceded territory which took effect January three, eighteen hundred and fifty-five, the date of the approval of the act of congress consenting to such cession, is continued in force, subject to the retention by the state of Massachusetts of jurisdiction in any cause which arose or was pending before the date of the issuing of the proclamation provided in the third section of such act of the legislature of Massachusetts, provided, however, that nothing herein contained shall be construed to affect existing titles to property corporeal or incorporeal held under grants heretofore made by either of said states, nor to affect existing rights which said states, or either of them, or which the citizens of either of said states may have, by grant, letters patent or prescription irrespective of the boundary line hereby established, it not being the purpose hereof to define, limit or interfere with any such right, rights or privileges whatever the same may be.

Section 4. Vermont boundary line.

The boundary line between the state of New York and the state of Vermont shall be and hereby is fixed as follows: Beginning at a stone bound standing on the easterly slope of a hill, in latitude forty-two degrees forty-four minutes forty-five and two hundred one thousandths seconds north, longitude seventy-three degrees fifteen minutes fifty-four and nine hundred four thousandths seconds west from Greenwich, a point in the southerly line of the state of Vermont; thence the line runs on a bearing north eighty-eight degrees thirty-three minutes twenty seconds west, three thousand two hundred five and seven-tenths feet to monument number two, standing at the southwest corner of the state of Vermont; thence north eleven degrees fifty-nine seconds west, twenty-one thousand eight hundred sixty-eight and eight-tenths feet, to monument number six on the northwest slope of a mountain and one hundred ninety feet northwest to a small brook which runs into the Hoosic river about four hundred feet up stream from the lower covered bridge at North Pownal; thence north twenty-nine degrees one minute thirty-three seconds east, two thousand six hundred forty feet, to monument number seven which is a large block of granite set in the bed of the brook above mentioned and at the point where it enters Hoosic river; thence north seven degrees eighteen minutes seventeen seconds west, three hundred ninety-six feet along the west bank of Hoosic river to monument number eight on the north side of the highway leading from North Pownal to North Petersburgh and near the northwest corner of the covered bridge before mentioned; thence north twenty-one degrees twenty-one minutes forty-three seconds east, two thousand fifteen and five-tenths feet across Hoosic river to monument number nine, on southwest side of the west bound track of the Boston and Maine railroad, and is between said track and Hoosic river opposite a ledge of rock; thence north thirty degrees forty minutes seven seconds west, one thousand one hundred fifty-six and two-tenths feet along the northeast bank of Hoosic river to monument number ten between said river and the west bound track of the Boston and Maine railroad; thence north fourteen degrees forty minutes west, one thousand one hundred seventy-three and seven-tenths feet across said track and highway leading from north Pownal to Petersburgh Junction to monument number twelve, on brow of a hill just north of said highway and at the corner of two stone walls; thence north five degrees nineteen minutes fifty-seven seconds east, five thousand eighty-two feet to monument number thirteen, on the north side of a highway known as the Skipperee road and about four hundred twenty feet southeast of house on lands owned by Edgar Green; thence north forty degrees twenty minutes east, three hundred ninety-six feet to monument number fourteen, at edge of woods on the southwest slope of the hill north of the Skipperee road; thence south seventy-one degrees thirty-nine minutes fifty-five seconds east, one thousand six hundred twenty-six and two-tenths feet to monument number fifteen, in woods and on the slope of hill north of Skipperee road; thence north three degrees twenty minutes eighteen seconds east, one thousand four hundred eighty-two and three-tenths feet to monument number sixteen, at the corner of the towns of Pownal and Bennington; thence north one degree thirty-three minutes five seconds east, thirty-five thousand three hundred thirty-five and seven-tenths feet to monument number twenty-seven, at the corner of the towns of Bennington and Shaftsbury; thence north two degrees seven minutes twenty-five seconds east, thirty-five thousand one hundred sixty-five and six-tenths feet to monument number forty at the corner of the towns of Shaftsbury and Arlington; thence north two degrees forty-five minutes seventeen seconds east, thirty-three thousand nine hundred sixty-one feet to monument number fifty-two, at the corner of the towns of Arlington and Sandgate; thence north one degree twenty-seven minutes three seconds east, eleven thousand one hundred fifty-four and four-tenths feet to monument number fifty-five, on the north side of Camden Valley road and about one-quarter mile west of R. C. Smith's house; thence north two degrees forty-two minutes nine seconds east, sixteen thousand eight hundred sixty-eight and eight-tenths feet to monument number sixty, on the north side of Beattie Hollow road; thence north one degree fifty-one minutes nine seconds east, two thousand seven hundred eighty-five and three-tenths feet to monument number sixty-one on the north side of Perkins Hollow road; thence north one degree fifty minutes forty seconds east, three thousand three hundred eighty and nine-tenths feet to monument number sixty-two, at corner of the towns of Sandgate and Rupert; thence north one degree forty-six minutes twenty-four seconds east, three thousand nine hundred eighty-six and seven-tenths feet to monument number sixty-three on the south side of the Salem-Rupert road; thence north one degree forty minutes thirty-three seconds east, six hundred forty-one and five-tenths feet to monument number sixty-four, on the south side of right of way of Delaware and Hudson railroad; thence north one degree thirty-eight minutes nine seconds east, three thousand four hundred sixty-four and two-tenths feet to monument number sixty-five, at the top of long open slope on north side of and overlooking the valley at West Rupert; thence north three degrees twenty-three minutes thirty-four seconds east, three thousand six hundred sixty-one and seven-tenths feet to monument number sixty-seven, at a point about midway between two highways and about one and one-third miles north of Delaware and Hudson railroad; thence north three degrees thirty-one minutes fifty-five seconds east, three thousand three hundred twenty-six and two-tenths feet to monument number sixty-nine, on sloping ground between two brooks; thence north one degree twenty-three minutes thirty-one seconds east, twenty thousand four hundred fifty-six and two-tenths feet to monument number seventy-six, at the corner of the counties of Bennington and Rutland; thence north one degree thirty-two minutes three seconds east, fourteen thousand twenty-five and five-tenths feet to monument number eighty, in West Pawlet on north side of highway leading southwest out of said village and about three hundred fifty feet from the Delaware and Hudson railroad crossing in West Pawlet; thence north one degree forty-nine minutes fourteen seconds east, twenty thousand three hundred eighty-one and nine-tenths feet to monument number ninety, at the corner of the towns of Pawlet and Wells; thence north one degree thirty-five minutes twenty-nine seconds east, nineteen thousand three hundred seventy-two and nine-tenths feet to monument number ninety-six, at the corner of the towns of Wells and Poultney; thence north one degree twenty-eight minutes fifty-nine seconds east, nineteen thousand two hundred forty-five and two-tenths feet to monument number one hundred one, on the south bank of Poultney river; thence about fifty-five feet along the previous course continued in the middle of the deepest channel of said river; thence along the middle of the deepest channel of said river to East bay; thence along the middle of the deepest channel of East bay and the waters thereof to where the same communicates with Lake Champlain; thence along the middle of the deepest channel of Lake Champlain to the eastward of the islands called the Four Brothers and westward of the islands called Grand isle and Long isle or the Two Heroes, and to the westward of the Isle La Mott, to the parallel of the forty-fifth degree north latitude, as run by Valentine and Collins, seventeen hundred and seventy-one to seventeen hundred and seventy-four; according to report dated October seventh, seventeen hundred and ninety-one, of commissioners appointed by chapter eighteen of the laws passed at the thirteenth session of the legislature of this state in seventeen hundred and ninety; thereby including within the state of New York, all that portion of the former town of Fair Haven, formerly in the county of Rutland and state of Vermont, lying westerly from the middle of the deepest channel of Poultney river as it now runs, and between the middle of the deepest channel of such river and the west line of the state of Vermont, as established on March nineteen, eighteen hundred and seventy-nine, as the same is described in an act of the legislature of Vermont entitled "An act annexing that portion of the town of Fair Haven, lying west of Poultney river, to the state of New York," and approved by the governor of Vermont, November twenty-seven, eighteen hundred and seventy-six. The acceptance by this state of sovereignty and jurisdiction of such ceded territory which took effect April seventh, eighteen hundred and eighty, the date of the approval of the act of congress consenting to such cession, is continued in force. Nothing in this section contained shall be deemed to affect the determination of the boundary line between the state of New York and the commonwealth of Massachusetts.

Section 5. Canada boundary line.

The boundary line between the state of New York and Canada is as follows:

Commencing at the intersection of the parallel of the forty-fifth degree of north latitude with the middle of the deepest channel of the Richelieu river and running thence westerly along said parallel of forty-five degrees north latitude as originally run by Valentine and Collins, 1771-1774, to a point on the south shore of the St. Lawrence river (but shown by the United States survey of boundary line in 1845, under treaty of Washington, 1842, on sheet maps XXVI to XXX to vary from true parallel of forty-five degrees, as follows: monument 645, on bank of Richelieu river, is .822 miles north of parallel of 45° and .02 miles west from river; thence westerly 14.68 miles to monument 673, at .336 miles north; thence westerly 6.56 miles to monument 685, at .353 miles north; thence westerly 9.20 miles to monument 703, at .004 miles south; thence westerly 7.43 miles to monument 717, at .429 miles south; thence westerly 10.02 miles to monument 737, at .475 miles south; thence westerly 6.34 miles to monument 749, at .140 miles south; thence westerly 5.88 miles to monument 762, on true parallel of 45°; thence westerly 4.20 miles to monument 774, at .030 miles north on bank of St. Lawrence river S. 74° 45' W. 1840 yards distant from the stone church in the Indian village of St. Regis, this line being recognized as the boundary line by article one of said treaty of Washington). Thence beginning at aforesaid point on the south shore of the Saint Lawrence river, marked by monument 774, under the treaty of Washington, 1842, and in 1817 by a stone monument erected by Andrew Ellicott (the location of which point is described above), and running north 35° 45' west into the river, on a line at right angles with the southern shore, to a point 100 yards south of the opposite island, called Cornwall island; thence turning westerly and passing around the southern and western side of said island keeping 100 yards distant therefrom, and following the curvatures of its shores, to a point opposite to the northwest corner or angle of said island; thence to and along the middle of the main river until it approaches the eastern extremity of Barnhart's island; thence northerly along the channel which divides the last mentioned island from the Canada shore, keeping 100 yards distant from the island, until it approaches Sheik's island; thence along the middle of the strait which divides Barnhart's and Sheik's islands to the channel called the Long Sault, which separates the two last mentioned islands from the lower Long Sault island; thence westerly (crossing the center of the last mentioned channel) until it approaches within 100 yards of the north shore of the Lower Sault island; thence up the north branch of the river keeping to the north of and near the Lower Sault island, and also north of and near the Upper Sault, sometimes called Baxter's island, and south of the two small islands marked on the map A and B, to the western extremity of the Upper Sault or Baxter's island; thence passing between the two islands called the Cats, to the middle of the river above; thence along the middle of the river, keeping to the north of the small islands marked C and D, and north also of Chrystler's island, and of the small island next above it, marked E, until it approaches the northeast angle of Goose Neck island; thence along the passage which divides the last mentioned island from the Canada shore, keeping 100 yards from the island to the upper end of the same; thence south of and near the two small islands called the Nut islands; thence north of and near the island marked F, and also of the island called Dry or Smuggler's island; thence passing between the islands marked G and H to the north of the island called Isle au Rapid Platt; thence along the north side of the last mentioned island, keeping 100 yards from the shore, to the upper end thereof; thence along the middle of the river, keeping to the south of and near the islands called Coussin (or Tussin) and Presque isle; thence up the river, keeping north of and near the several Gallop Isles numbered on the map, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10, and also of Tick, Tibbits, and Chimney islands, and south of and near the Gallop isles numbered 11, 12 and 13, and also of Duck, Drummond, and Sheep islands; thence along the middle of the river, passing north of island No. 14, south of 15 and 16, north of 17, south of 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 and 28, and north of 26 and 27; thence along the middle of the river, north of Gull island and of the islands Nos. 29, 32, 33, 34, 35, Bluff island, and Nos. 39, 44 and 45, and to the south of Nos. 30, 31, 36, Grenadier island, and Nos. 27, 28, 40, 41, 42, 43, 46, 47 and 48 until it approaches the east end of Wells island, thence to the north of Wells island, and along the strait which divides it from Rowe's island, keeping to the north of the small islands Nos. 51, 52, 54, 58, 59 and 61, and to the south of the small islands numbered and marked 49, 50, 53, 55, 57, 60, and X, until it approaches the northeast point of Grindstone island; thence to the north of Grindstone island and keeping to the north also of the small islands Nos. 63, 65, 67, 68, 70, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77 and 78, and to the south of Nos. 62, 64, 66, 69 and 71, until it approaches the southern point of Hickory island; thence passing to the south of Hickory island and of the two small islands lying near its southern extremity numbered 79 and 80; thence to the south of Grand or Long island, keeping near its southern shore, and passing to the north of Carlton island, until it arrives opposite to the southwestern point, of said Grand island, in Lake Ontario; thence, passing to the north of Grenadier, Fox, Stony, and the Gallop islands, in Lake Ontario, and to the south of and near the islands called the Ducks, to the middle of the said lake, thence westerly along the middle of said lake to a point opposite the mouth of the Niagara river, thence to and up the middle of the said river to the Great Falls; thence up the Falls through the point of the Horse Shoe, keeping to the west of Irish or Goat island, and of the group of small islands at its head, and following the bends of the river so as to enter the strait between Navy and Grand islands; thence along the middle of said strait to the head of Navy island; thence to the west and south of and near to Grand and Beaver islands, and to the west of Strawberry, Squaw, and Bird islands to Lake Erie; thence southerly and westerly along the middle of Lake Erie in a direction to enter the passage immediately south of Middle island, being one of the easternmost of the group of islands lying in the western part of said lake (according to the decision of the commissioners under the sixth article of the treaty of Ghent, 1814, done at Utica, state of New York, June 18, 1822) to intersection with meridian line of Cession, drawn through the most westerly bent or inclination of Lake Ontario, under deed of cession to the United States, executed March 1, 1781, under chapter thirty-eight of the third session of the legislature of this state in 1780, which meridian line was surveyed and marked with monuments by Andrew Ellicott in 1790, as duly appointed under resolution of Congress, August 19, 1789, and resurveyed in 1881 to 1885, and final report made December 1, 1885, by H. W. Clarke, civil engineer and surveyor, on the part of the state of New York.

Section 6. Pennsylvania boundary line.

The boundary line between the states of New York and Pennsylvania is as follows:

Commencing at said intersection of said meridian line of cession, and running thence south to the shore of Lake Erie at initial monument set by A. Ellicott in 1790 as above; thence true south 440 feet to a large monument of Quincy granite, set in 1869, in latitude 42° 16' 5.39", and longitude 79° 45' 45.26", as deduced by the United States lake survey, marked 1869, latitude 42° 15' 57.9", longitude 79° 45' 54.4", by commissioners duly authorized on the part of the states of New York and Pennsylvania as stated in reports of regents boundary commission in 1886; thence south on said meridian line 13.895 miles to Fourteen Mile point; thence south 4.647 miles at an angle of 4' west to a large terminal monument; thence on the same line 100 feet to the southwest corner of New York marked by monument (in latitude 42° 0' 1.42", as determined by state survey) set in 1787 by A. Hardenburgh and W. W. Morris, commissioners on the part of New York, and A. Ellicott and A. Porter, commissioners on the part of Pennsylvania; thence due east on parallel of latitude of 42°, as surveyed and marked by monuments by said commission, to the ninetieth mile stone erected in 1786 by James Clinton and Simeon De Witt, commissioners on the part of New York, and Andrew Ellicott, commissioner on the part of Pennsylvania, on the west side of the south branch of the Tioga river in latitude 42° 0' 1.3" as deduced by the state surveyor in 1879; thence due east on line established and marked by the last mentioned commission to a point in the center of Delaware river, such line passing through a monument set in the year 1884 by H. W. Clarke, surveyor, on the part of the state of New York, and C. M. Gere, surveyor, on the part of the state of Pennsylvania, and located six hundred feet west of the center of said river (all of the above line passing through monuments placed between the years 1881 and 1885 by said H. W. Clarke and C. M. Gere, of which a schedule is given in their report to the commission appointed by virtue of the provisions of chapter three hundred and forty of the laws of eighteen hundred and eighty, and dated December 1, 1885, showing angular deflections at each mile stone, with distances between each, summarized as follows: Southwest state corner to Chautaugua county corner 36.090 miles; to Cattaraugus county corner 38.743 miles; to Allegany county corner 28.769 miles; to Steuben county corner (mile post eighty-two) 40.411 miles; to Tioga county corner, on the left bank of the Chemung river, 21.066 miles; to Broome county corner 23.387 miles; to the center of the Delaware river 38.396 miles; thence down the center of the Delaware river about eighty-five miles to its junction with the Neversink river; each of the states of New York and Pennsylvania having concurrent jurisdiction within and upon the waters of that portion of the main channel of the Delaware river between the lines of low water at either bank thereof; then S. 51° E. on prolongation of boundary line between New York and New Jersey, to "tri-state monument," set in 1882 by joint commission, over bolt in bare lime-stone rock near the confluence of the Neversink and Delaware rivers as settled in 1769 by commission appointed by king of Great Britain, and marked by a crow foot cut into its upper face, in latitude 41° 21' 22.63", and longitude 74° 41' 40.70" west as determined by the United States coast survey in 1874. The said metes and bounds are in accordance with and subject to the agreement between commissioners of the states of New York and Pennsylvania, which took effect August 19, 1890, the date of the approval of the act of Congress consenting thereto. The ratification and confirmation by this state of such agreement is continued in force. The following is a copy of such agreement:

"An agreement made the twenty-sixth day of March, in the year eighteen hundred and eighty-six, between Henry R. Pierson, Elias W. Leavenworth and Chauncey M. Depew, commissioners on the part of the state of New York, and Christopher M. Gere and Robert N. Torry, commissioners on the part of the state of Pennsylvania.

WHEREAS, By the first section of chapter four hundred and twenty-four of the laws of the state of New York, for the year eighteen hundred and seventy-five, the regents of the university of the state of New York were authorized and directed to resume the work of 'examination as to the true location of the monuments which mark the several boundaries of the state,' as authorized by the resolution of the senate of April nineteenth, eighteen hundred and sixty-seven, and in connection with the authorities of Pennsylvania, to replace any monuments which may have become dilapidated or been removed on the boundary line of that state; and,

WHEREAS, The said board of regents of the university did through a committee of said board, previously appointed for the purpose, under said senate resolution of eighteen hundred and sixty-seven, proceed to carry out the instructions contained in said chapter four hundred and twenty-four of the laws of eighteen hundred and seventy-five; and,

WHEREAS, By chapter three hundred and forty of the laws of the said state of New York for the year eighteen hundred and eighty the said regents of the university were further authorized and empowered to designate and appoint three of their number as commissioners to meet such commissioners as may have been or may be appointed on the part of the state of Pennsylvania, and with such last-named commissioners as soon as may be, to proceed to ascertain and agree upon the location of the boundary line between said states, as originally established and marked with monuments, and in case any monuments are found dilapidated or removed from their original location, to replace them in a durable manner in their original position, and to erect such additional monuments at such places on such lines as they may deem necessary for the proper designation of the boundary line between said state; and,

WHEREAS, The above-named Henry R. Pierson, Elias W. Leavenworth and Chauncey M. Depew were by resolution passed on the thirteenth day of July, eighteen hundred and eighty, duly designated and appointed by the said regents of the university of the state of New York as commissioners on the part of the state of New York for the purposes mentioned in said act; and,

WHEREAS, Also, by an act of the legislature of the state of Pennsylvania, entitled 'An act in regard to the boundary monuments on the line between the state of Pennsylvania and New York, with an appropriation for expenses of the same,' passed May eighth, eighteen hundred and seventy-six, the governor of the state of Pennsylvania was authorized and empowered 'to appoint three persons to be a commission to act in conjunction with a similar commission of the state of New York, to examine as to the true location of the monuments which mark the boundary line between this state and the state of New York, and in connection with said commission of the state of New York, to replace any monuments which may have been dilapidated or been removed on the boundary lines of said states'; and,

WHEREAS, The governor of the state of Pennsylvania, under authority of said act, did duly designate and appoint James Worrall, Christopher M. Gere and Robert N. Torry, to be a commission for the purposes of said act; and,

WHEREAS, James Worrall, the first-named member of said commission, died during the progress of the work on said boundary line; to wit, on April first, eighteen hundred and eighty-five, and the surviving members, to wit: Christopher M. Gere and Robert N. Torry, have continued the work of said commission on the part of the state of Pennsylvania, as authorized by the aforesaid act.

NOW, THEREFORE, the said commissioners for and on behalf of their respective states, having duly performed the duties imposed upon them by the said acts, and having examined said boundary line, and replaced in a durable manner the monuments to mark the same in pursuance of the authority duly given as aforesaid, have agreed and do hereby agree as follows:

First. The channel of the Delaware river, from a line drawn across said channel, from a granite monument erected upon the eastern bank of said river in the year eighteen hundred and eighty-two, by the joint boundary commission of the states of New Jersey and New York to mark the western extremity of the boundary line between said states of New Jersey and New York, in a westerly prolongation of said boundary line up and along said channel of said Delaware river as it winds and turns, for a distance of eighty-five miles or thereabouts, to a line drawn east across said river from a granite monument erected upon the west bank of said river in the year eighteen hundred and eighty-four, by H. W. Clarke and C. M. Gere, to mark the eastern extremity of the first line hereinafter described, shall continue to be a part of the boundary or partition line between the said two states; provided, however, that the limit of territory between the said two states shall be the center of the said main channel, and provided further, that each state shall enjoy and exercise a concurrent jurisdiction within and upon the water of said main channel between the lines of low water at either bank thereof, between the limits hereinbefore mentioned.

Second. The line extending from the Delaware river aforesaid, at a point upon said river fixed and marked with monuments (which have since disappeared), by David Rittenhouse and Samuel Holland, in the month of November, in the year seventeen hundred and seventy-four, west, as the same was surveyed and marked with monuments in the year seventeen hundred and eighty-six, as far as the ninetieth milestone, by James Clinton and Simeon De Witt, commissioners on the part of the state of New York, duly appointed for that purpose by the governor of said state, in pursuance of an act of the legislature of said state, entitled 'An act for running out and marking the jurisdiction line between this state and the commonwealth of Pennsylvania,' passed seventh March, seventeen hundred and eighty-five, and David Rittenhouse, Andrew Porter and Andrew Ellicott, commissioners on the part of the commonwealth of Pennsylvania, duly appointed for that purpose by the supreme executive council of said commonwealth in pursuance of an act of the general assembly of said commonwealth, entitled, 'An act to authorize and enable the supreme executive council to appoint commissioners to join with the commissioners appointed, or to be appointed, on the part of the state of New York, to ascertain the northern boundary of this state from the river Delaware westward to the northwest corner of Pennsylvania,' passed thirty-first March, seventeen hundred and eighty-five, and from the said ninetieth milestone west, as the same was surveyed and marked with monuments and posts in seventeen hundred and eighty-seven by Abraham Hardenbergh and William W. Morris, commissioners on the part of the said state of New York, duly appointed in the place of Simeon De Witt and James Clinton aforesaid, by the governor of said state in pursuance of the act aforesaid, and the act supplementary thereto, passed by the legislature of said state, twenty-first April, seventeen hundred and eighty-seven, and Andrew Ellicott and Andrew Porter aforesaid, commissioners on the part of the commonwealth of Pennsylvania, to the point where said line is intersected by the line of cession or meridian boundary hereinafter described, which said line so surveyed and marked in the years seventeen hundred and eighty-six and seventeen hundred and eighty-seven has since been acknowledged and recognized by the said two states as a part of the limit of their respective territory and jurisdiction, shall notwithstanding any want of conformity to the verbal description as written in the charter of the province of Pennsylvania, granted to William Penn in the year sixteen hundred and eighty-two, or as recited by the commissioners aforesaid, continue to be the boundary or partition line between the two said states, from the Delaware river aforesaid, to the said point of intersection with the said line of cession; provided that wherever upon said line the locations of any of the monuments, or posts, erected by the said commissioners in seventeen hundred and eighty-six and seventeen hundred eighty-seven have been lost and cannot otherwise be definitely fixed, then and in that case, and in every case where it is required to establish intervening points in said line, a straight line drawn between the nearest adjacent monuments whose localities are ascertained shall be understood to be, and shall be, the true boundary line.

Third. The line of cession, described as a meridian line, drawn from the forty-fifth degree of north latitude, south through the most westerly bent or inclination of Lake Ontario, in the deed of cession to the United States of certain territory claimed by the state of New York, lying west of said line, executed first March, seventeen hundred and eighty-one, by James Duane, William Floyd and Alexander McDougal, delegates in congress of said United States from the said state of New York, in pursuance of an act of the legislature of said state, entitled 'An act to facilitate the completion of the articles of confederation and perpetual union among the United States of America,' passed February nineteenth, seventeen hundred and eighty, which said territory was afterward conveyed by the United States aforesaid to, and became a part of the territory and jurisdiction of the said commonwealth of Pennsylvania, as the said line was surveyed and marked with posts and monuments of stone in the year seventeen hundred and ninety, by Andrew Ellicott, who was duly appointed for that purpose by the president of the United States, in pursuance of a resolution of congress, passed nineteenth August, seventeen hundred and eighty-nine, which said line, and its prolongation due north into the waters of Lake Erie until it intersects the northern boundary of the United States aforesaid, have since been acknowledged and recognized by the said two states, as a part of the limit of their respective territory and jurisdiction shall, notwithstanding any possible want of conformity to the verbal description thereof, as contained in said deed of cession, continue to be the boundary or partition line between the two said states, so far as said line so surveyed and marked in seventeen hundred and ninety shall extend.

Fourth. The monumental marks by which the said boundary line, except such portions thereof as may be within the waters of the Delaware river, and Lake Erie, shall hereafter be known and recognized, are hereby declared to be---

I. The original monuments of stone, erected in the years seventeen hundred and eighty-six and seventeen hundred and eighty-seven by the commissioners aforesaid, and in the year seventeen hundred and ninety by Andrew Ellicott aforesaid, as the same have been restored and re-established in their original positions, or have been replaced by granite monuments erected in the years eighteen hundred and eighty-one, eighteen hundred and eighty-two, eighteen hundred and eighty-three, eighteen hundred and eighty-four and eighteen hundred and eighty-five, by H. Wadsworth Clarke, surveyor on the part of New York, and Christopher M. Gere, surveyor on the part of Pennsylvania, duly appointed by the parties hereto.

II. The new monuments of granite, erected in the years eighteen hundred and eighty-one to eighteen hundred and eighty-five, inclusive, by the aforesaid surveyors, at intervals of one mile, more or less, and numbered consecutively, along said line originally surveyed and marked in the years seventeen hundred and eighty-six and seventeen hundred and eighty-seven, beginning from the Delaware river, and severally marked on the north side with the letters 'N. Y. ,' and on the other side with the letters 'Pa.' and along said line originally surveyed and marked in the year seventeen hundred and ninety, beginning at the shore of Lake Erie, and severally marked on the east side with the letters 'N. Y. ,' and on the west side with the letters 'Pa.'

III. The new monuments of granite erected by the said surveyors, in the years eighteen hundred and eighty-one to eighteen hundred and eighty-five, inclusive, aforesaid, at intervening points on said line, and at its intersection with public roads, railroads and rivers, and at other points, and severally marked on the one side with the letters 'N.Y. ,' and on the other side with the letters 'Pa.'

IV. A large monument of granite, erected in the year eighteen hundred and eighty-four by the said surveyors six hundred feet west of the center of the Delaware river in the said line originally fixed in the year seventeen hundred and eighty-six, to mark its eastern terminus; a large monument of granite erected in the year eighteen hundred and eighty-four by the said surveyors in the said line or meridian boundary, as originally fixed in the year seventeen hundred and ninety, one hundred feet north from its intersection with the line originally surveyed as aforesaid, in the years seventeen hundred and eighty-seven, which said point of intersection is marked by a small monument of granite buried in the center of the highway, in eighteen hundred and eighty-four by the said surveyors; and also a large monument of granite erected in the year eighteen hundred and sixty-nine by John V. L. Pruyn, George R. Perkins, Samuel B. Woolworth, and George W. Patterson on the part of the state of New York, and William Evans on the part of the state of Pennsylvania, four hundred and forty feet south of the original monuments erected in the year seventeen hundred and ninety, by Andrew Ellicott aforesaid, upon the south shore of Lake Erie, in the line originally surveyed and marked by him as aforesaid.

Fifth. The field book of said surveyors containing the notes of the re-surveys along said line in the years eighteen hundred and seventy-seven, eighteen hundred and seventy-eight and eighteen hundred and seventy-nine; also the 'record of monuments' prepared by said surveyors, containing the descriptions of the locations of the several monuments erected by them, and of the witness marks thereto; also the maps of said line, and the vicinity thereof, showing the locations of said monuments; and also the 'diary of operations' of said surveyors under the direction of the parties hereto; the same having been duly authenticated by the signature of the said surveyors, and the several documents and books of record containing the transactions of the parties hereto; all of which being placed on file in the office of the secretary of state of New York, and the office of the secretary of internal affairs of Pennsylvania, shall constitute the permanent and authentic records of said boundary line, and are hereby adopted by the parties hereto, and made a part of this agreement.

Sixth. This agreement shall become binding upon the two states when ratified by the legislatures thereof, respectively, and when confirmed by the congress of the United States.

In witness whereof the said commissioners have hereunto set their hands and seals in duplicate, the twenty-sixth day of March, eighteen hundred and eighty-six, aforesaid.

Executed in the presence of witnesses:

As to Henry R. Pierson: Edward I. Devlin,--- H. R. Pierson, L. S.

As to E. W. Leavenworth: H. W. Clarke,--- E. W. Leavenworth, L. S.

As to Chauncey M. Depew: Edward I. Devlin,--- Chauncey M. Depew, L. S.

As to C. M. Gere: A. D. Birchard,--- C. M. Gere, L. S.

As to Robert N. Torry: Andrew Thompson,--- Robert N. Torry, L. S. "

Section 7. New Jersey boundary line.

The boundary line between the states of New York and New Jersey is as follows:

Commencing at the said "tri-state monument, " and running thence along the line laid out by a joint commission from the states of New York and New Jersey in 1774, and which was more definitely marked with monuments by another joint commission in 1882, under chapter 340 of the laws of 1880, on an average course S. 51° E. , with slight deflections as to the same as marked by mile monuments, a distance of 48.20 miles to the station rock on the west bank of the Hudson river, said station rock being in latitude 40° 59' 48.17" north and longitude 73° 54' 11" west, as determined by the United States coast survey, and marked as the original terminal monument of the line as established in 1774, according to the report of the commissioners on the boundary between the state of New York and the state of New Jersey, dated March 24, 1884; thence easterly to a point in the Hudson river in latitude 40° 59' 49.74" north and longitude 73° 53' 38.57" west; thence southerly along the middle of said river and of the bay of New York to a point opposite the northeast angle of Staten Island; thence westerly along the center of the Kill von Kull to a point opposite the northwest angle of Staten Island; thence southerly along the center of the Arthur kill or Staten Island sound to a point at the entrance of Raritan bay, such point being in latitude 40° 29' 55.57" north, and longitude 74° 15' 33.31" west, as the same is shown on maps and agreement filed by a joint commission of the two states in the office of the secretary of state, and dated December 23, 1889; thence easterly through the center of Raritan bay to a point between Sandy Hook and Coney Island as the same is shown on a map filed with the secretary of state, and dated October 12, 1877, thence easterly to the main sea.

Such metes and bounds are as reported October 12, 1887, and December 23, 1889, by commissioners to mark out and locate the boundary line in land under water, between the states of New York and New Jersey, and are in accordance with and subject to the two agreements between commissioners of such states, made, respectively, September 16, 1833, and June 7, 1883, and which took effect, respectively, February 5, 1834, and May 23, 1884, the dates of the approvals of the acts of congress consenting thereto. The ratification and confirmation by this state of such agreements are continued in force. The following are copies of such agreements, respectively:

"Agreement made between the commissioners on the part of the state of New York, and the commissioners on the part of the state of New Jersey relative to the boundary line between the two states.

Agreement made and entered into by and between Benjamin F. Butler, Peter Augustus Jay and Henry Seymour, commissioners duly appointed on the part and behalf of the state of New York, in pursuance of an act of the legislature of the said state, entitled "An act concerning the territorial limits and jurisdiction of the state of New York and the state of New Jersey," Passed January 18, 1833, of the one part, and Theodore Frelinghuysen, James Parker and Lucius Q. C. Elmer, commissioners duly appointed on the part and behalf of the state of New Jersey, in pursuance of an act of the legislature of the said state, entitled "An act for the settlement of the territorial limits and jurisdiction between the states of New Jersey and New York," passed February 6, 1833, of the other part.

Article first.--- the boundary line between the two states of New York and New Jersey, from a point in the middle of Hudson river opposite the point on the west shore thereof, in the forty-first degree of north latitude, as heretofore ascertained and marked, to the main sea, shall be the middle of the said river, of the bay of New York, of the waters between Staten Island and New Jersey, and of Raritan bay, to the main sea, except as hereinafter otherwise particularly mentioned.

Article second.--- the state of New York shall retain its present jurisdiction of and over Bedlow's and Ellis' islands, and shall also retain exclusive jurisdiction of and over the other islands lying in the waters above mentioned, and now under the jurisdiction of that state.

Article third.--- the state of New York shall have and enjoy exclusive jurisdiction of and over all the waters of the bay of New York, and of and over all the waters of Hudson river lying west of Manhattan island and to the south of the mouth of Spuytenduyvel creek, and of and over the lands covered by the said waters to the low water mark on the westerly or New Jersey side thereof; subject to the following rights of property and of jurisdiction of the state of New Jersey, that is to say:

1. The state of New Jersey shall have the exclusive right of property in and to the land under water lying west of the middle of the bay of New York and west of the middle of that part of the Hudson river which lies between Manhattan island and New Jersey.

2. The state of New Jersey shall have the exclusive jurisdiction of and over the wharves, docks and improvements made, and to be made, on the shore of the said state, and of and over all vessels aground on said shore, or fastened to any such wharf or dock; except that the said vessels shall be subject to the quarantine or health laws, and laws in relation to passengers, of the state of New York, which now exist or which may hereafter be passed.

3. The state of New Jersey shall have the exclusive right of regulating the fisheries on the westerly side of the middle of said waters, provided that the navigation be not obstructed or hindered.

Article fourth.--- the state of New York shall have exclusive jurisdiction of and over the waters of the Kill van Kull, between Staten Island and New Jersey, to the westernmost end of Shooter's island, in respect to such quarantine laws and laws relating to passengers as now exists, or may hereafter be passed under the authority of that state, and for executing the same; and the said state shall also have exclusive jurisdiction, for the like purposes, of and over the waters of the sound, from the westernmost end of Shooter's island to Woodbridge creek, as to all vessels bound to any port in the said state of New York.

Article fifth.--- the state of New Jersey shall have and enjoy exclusive jurisdiction of and over all the waters of the sound between Staten Island and New Jersey, lying south of Woodbridge creek, and of and over all the waters of Raritan bay lying westward of a line drawn from the light-house at Princess' bay to the mouth of Mattavan creek, subject to the following rights of property and of jurisdiction of the state of New York:

1. The state of New York shall have the exclusive right of property in and to the land under water, lying between the middle of the said waters and Staten Island.

2. The state of New York shall have the exclusive jurisdiction of and over the wharves, docks and improvements made and to be made, on the shore of Staten Island; and of and over all vessels aground on said shore, or fastened to any such wharf or dock, except that the said vessel shall be subject to the quarantine or health laws, and laws in relation to passengers of the state of New Jersey which now exist, or which may hereafter be passed.

3. The state of New York shall have the exclusive right of regulating the fisheries between the shore of Staten Island and the middle of the said waters, provided that the navigation of the said waters be not obstructed or hindered.

Article sixth.--- Criminal process issued under the authority of the state of New Jersey, against any person accused of an offense committed within that state; or committed on board of any vessel being under the exclusive jurisdiction of that state as aforesaid; or committed against the regulations made or to be made by that state, in relation to the fisheries mentioned in the third article; and also civil process issued under the authority of the state of New Jersey against any person domiciled in that state, or against property taken out of that state to evade the laws thereof; may be served upon any of the said waters within the exclusive jurisdiction of the state of New York, unless such person or property shall be on board a vessel aground upon, or fastened to the shore of the state of New York, or fastened to a wharf adjoining thereto; or unless such person shall be under arrest, or such property shall be under seizure, by virtue of process or authority of the state of New York.

Article seventh.--- Criminal process issued under the authority of the state of New York, against any person accused of an offense committed within that state; or committed on board of any vessel being under the exclusive jurisdiction of that state as aforesaid; or committed against the regulations made or to be made by that state, in relation to the fisheries mentioned in the fifth article; and also civil process issued under the authority of the state of New York against any person domiciled in that state, or against property taken out of that state to evade the laws thereof; may be served upon any of the said waters within the exclusive jurisdiction of the state of New Jersey, unless such person or property shall be on board a vessel aground upon, or fastened to the shore of the state of New Jersey, or fastened to a wharf adjoining thereto; or unless such person shall be under arrest, or such property shall be under seizure, by virtue of process or authority of the state of New Jersey.

Article eighth.--- This agreement shall become binding on the two states when confirmed by the legislatures thereof respectively, and when approved by the congress of the United States.

Done in four parts (two of which are retained by the commissioners of New York, to be delivered to the governor of that state, and the other two of which are retained by the commissioners of New Jersey, to be delivered to the governor of that state), at the city of New York, this sixteenth day of September, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and thirty-three, and of the independence of the United States, the fifty-eighth. (Signed,) B. F. BUTLER, PETER AUGUSTUS JAY, HENRY SEYMOUR, THEO. FRELINGHUYSEN, JAMES PARKER, LUCIUS Q. C. ELMER. "

"An agreement made the seventh day of June, in the year eighteen hundred and eighty-three, between Henry R. Pierson, Elias W. Leavenworth and Chauncey M. Depew, commissioners on the part of the state of New York, and Abraham Browning, Thomas N. McCarter and George H. Cook, commissioners on the part of the state of New Jersey.

WHEREAS, by the first section of chapter three hundred and forty of the laws of the state of New York for the year eighteen hundred and eighty, it was recited, among other things, that whereas, by an act of the legislature passed the twenty-sixth day of May, eighteen hundred and seventy-five, the regents of the university of the state of New York were authorized and directed, in connection with the authorities of Pennsylvania and New Jersey, respectively, to replace any monuments which have become dilapidated or been removed on the boundary lines of those states, and it was thereby declared that the lines originally laid down and marked with monuments by the several joint commissioners, duly appointed for that purpose, and which have since been acknowledged and legally recognized by the several states interested, as the limits of their territory and jurisdiction, are the boundary lines of said states irrespective of want of conformity to the verbal descriptions thereof; and by the second section of the same chapter of the laws of the state of New York, the said regents were authorized and empowered to designate and appoint three of their number as commissioners, to meet such commissioners as may have been, or may be, appointed on the part of the states of Pennsylvania and New Jersey, or either of them, and with such last-named commissioners, as soon as may be, to proceed to ascertain and agree upon the location of said lines as originally established and marked with monuments, and in case any monuments are found dilapidated or removed from their original location, said commissioners are authorized to replace them in a durable manner in their original positions, and to erect such additional monuments at such places on said lines as they may deem necessary for the proper designation of the boundary lines of said states; and

WHEREAS, Also the above-named Henry R. Pierson, Elias W. Leavenworth and Chauncey M. Depew have been duly designated and appointed by the said regents of the university of the state of New York, commissioners on the part of said state for the purposes mentioned in said act; and

WHEREAS, Also by an act of the legislature of the state of New Jersey, entitled 'An act appointing commissioners to locate the northern boundary line between the states of New York and New Jersey and to replace and erect monuments thereon,' approved April thirteen, eighteen hundred and seventy-six, the governor of the state of New Jersey was authorized to appoint three commissioners with power, on the part of said state of New Jersey, to meet any authorities on the part of the state of New York, who may be duly authorized, and with them to negotiate and agree upon the true location of the said boundary line between the states of New York and New Jersey, and also to replace any monuments which may have become dilapidated, or been removed, on said boundary line, and to erect new ones, which agreement it was thereby enacted should be in writing and signed and sealed by the authorities of the state of New York and the commissioners of the state of New Jersey; and

WHEREAS, The above-named Abraham Browning, Thomas N. McCarter and George H. Cook have been duly appointed commissioners on the part of the state of New Jersey, under said act; and

WHEREAS, By a supplement to the last said act, approved on the twenty-fifth day of March, eighteen hundred and eighty-one, the commissioners under the last said act were, in addition to the authority conferred by the last said act, also authorized in their discretion to proceed to ascertain and agree upon the location of the northern boundary line between the states of New York and New Jersey, as originally established and marked with monuments, and in case any monuments are found dilapidated, or removed from their original location, said commissioners were authorized to renew and replace them in a durable manner in their original positions, and to erect such additional monuments, at such places on said line, as they may deem necessary for the proper designation of the boundary line of said states; and

WHEREAS, The said commissioners, acting for and on behalf of their respective states, have entered upon the performance of the duties imposed upon them by the said acts, and have, in pursuance of the authority to them severally given as aforesaid, agreed, and hereby do agree, as follows:

First.--- The lines extending from the Hudson river on the east to the Delaware river on the west, as the same was laid down and marked with monuments in seventeen hundred and seventy-four, by William Wickham and Samuel Gale, commissioners on the part of the then colony of New York, duly appointed for that purpose in pursuance of an act of the assembly of the colony of New York, passed on the sixteenth day of February, seventeen hundred and seventy-one, entitled 'An act for establishing the boundary or partition line between the colonies of New York and Nova Caesarea, or New Jersey, and for conferring titles and possession," and John Stevens and Walter Rutherford, commissioners on the part of the then colony of New Jersey, duly appointed in pursuance of an act of the assembly of the colony of New Jersey, passed on the twenty-third day of September, seventeen hundred and seventy-two, entitled 'An act for establishing the boundary or partition line between the colonies of New York and Nova Caesarea, or New Jersey, and for conferring titles and possession,' which said line has since been acknowledged and recognized by the two states as the limit of their respective territory and jurisdiction, shall, notwithstanding its want of conformity to the verbal description thereof as recited by said commissioners, continue to be the boundary or partition line between the said two states; provided that wherever upon said line the location of one or more of the monuments, erected by said commissioners in seventeen hundred and seventy-four, has been lost and cannot be otherwise definitely fixed and determined, then, and in that case and in every case where it is required to establish intervening points on said line, a straight line drawn betwen the nearest adjacent monuments whose localities are ascertained shall be the true boundary line.

Second. The monumental marks by which said boundary line shall hereafter be known and recognized are hereby declared to be, first, the original monuments of stone erected in seventeen hundred and seventy-four, along said line, by the commissioners aforesaid, as the same have been restored and re-established in their original positions by Edward A. Bowser, surveyor on the part of New Jersey, and Henry W. Clarke, surveyor on the part of New York, duly appointed by the parties hereto; second, the new monuments of granite erected by the aforesaid surveyors at intervals of one mile, more or less, along said line and numbered consecutively, beginning from the Hudson river, and severally marked on the northerly side with the letters N. Y. , and on the southerly side with the letters N. J.; and third, the monuments of granite erected by the aforesaid surveyors at intervening points on said line at its intersection with public roads, railroads and rivers, and severally marked by them, on the northerly side with the letters N. Y. , and on the southerly side with the letters N. J. , and fourth, the terminal monuments erected at the western terminus of said line at the confluence of the Delaware and Navesink rivers, and the terminal monument erected on the brow of the rock called the Palisades, near the eastern terminus, and the rock lying and being at the foot of the Palisades on the bank of the Hudson river, and marked as the original terminal monument of said line established in seventeen hundred and seventy-four, as the same are described in a joint report made to the parties hereto by Elias W. Leavenworth, commissioner on the part of New York, and George H. Cook, commissioner on the part of New Jersey.

Third. The field books of said surveyors containing the descriptions of the locations of the several monuments erected by them and of the witness marks thereto, the report of said surveyors containing the account of their work in ascertaining and marking said line, together with the topographical map of said line and the vicinity thereof, and the several documents and books of record containing the transactions of the parties aforesaid, having been duly authenticated and attested by the signatures of the said commissioners, and placed in file in the offices of the secretaries of state of the two states, shall constitute the permanent and authentic records of said boundary line, and are hereby adopted by the parties hereto, and made part of this agreement.

Fourth. This agreement shall become binding on the two states when confirmed by the legislatures thereof, respectively, and when confirmed by the congress of the United States.

In witness whereof, the said commissioners have hereto set their hands and seals, in duplicate, this seventh day of June, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and eighty-three.

HENRY R. PIERSON.

E. W. LEAVENWORTH.

CHAUNCEY M. DEPEW.

A. BROWNING.

THOMAS N. McCARTER.

GEO. H. COOK. Executed in the presence of: Witness as to Henry R. Pierson, A. C. Judson, Albany, N. Y.

As to Chauncey M. Depew, W. J. Van Arsdale.

As to commissioners of New Jersey, B. Williamson.

Witness to the signature of E. W. Leavenworth, A. F. Lewis." Trenton, January 18, 1890.

An agreement, made the twelfth day of October in the year 1887, between Mayo W. Hazeltine, Robert Moore and Lieut. G. C. Hanus, U. S. N. , commissioners on the part of the state of New York, and George H. Cook, Robert C. Bacot and A. B. Stoney, commissioners on the part of the state of New Jersey.

WHEREAS, by chapter 69, of the laws of the state of New York for the year 1887, the governor was authorized to appoint three commissioners on the part of the state of New York, with full power to meet with the commissioners duly authorized on the part of the state of New Jersey, and with them locate and mark out by proper monuments and buoys the true boundary line between the two states in lands under water in Raritan bay; and

WHEREAS, the said Mayo W. Hazeltine, Robert Moore and Lieut. G. C. Hanus, U. S. N. , were duly appointed commissioners on the part of the state of New York for the purposes mentioned in the said act; and

WHEREAS, by an act of the legislature of the state of New Jersey, passed April 20, 1886, entitled a "Joint resolution authorizing the appointment of a commissioner to locate and mark out the boundary line between the state of New Jersey and the state of New York in Raritan bay," the governor of the state of New Jersey was authorized to appoint three commissioners, with power on the part of the state to meet any authorities duly authorized on the part of the state of New York, and with them locate by proper buoys the boundary line between the two states of lands under water in Raritan bay; and

WHEREAS, the said George H. Cook, Robert C. Bacot and A. B. Stoney, were duly appointed commissioners for the purposes of said act; and

WHEREAS, the said commissioners, acting for and on behalf of their respective states, have entered upon the performance of the duties imposed upon them by said act, and have in pursuance of the authority to them severally given as aforesaid agreed and hereby do agree upon a boundary line between the two states in lands under water in Raritan bay, and locate the same as follows:

First. From the "Great Beds Lighthouse" in Raritan bay north 20° 16' west, true, to a point in the middle of the waters of Arthur Kill or Staten Island sound, equidistant between the southwesterly corner of the dwelling-house of David C. Butler, at Ward's Point, on Staten Island, in the state of New York, and the southeasterly corner of the brick building on the lands of Cortlandt L. Parker, at the intersection of the westerly line of Water street with the northerly line of Lewis street, in Perth Amboy, in the state of New Jersey.

Second. From "Great Beds Lighthouse" S. 64° 21' E. true, in the line with the center Waackaack or Wilson's Beacon, in Monmouth county, New Jersey, to a point at the intersection of the said line with a line connecting "Morgan No. 2" triangulation point U. S. Coast and geodetic survey in Middlesex county, New Jersey, with the granite and iron beacon marked on the accompanying map as "Roamer Stone Beacon" situated on the "Dry Roamer Shoal;" and thence on a line bearing N. 77° 9' E. true, connecting "Morgan No. 2" triangulation point U. S. Coast and geodetic survey in Middlesex county, New Jersey, with said "Roamer Stone Beacon" (the line passing through said beacon and continuing in the same direction) to a point at its intersection with a line drawn between the "Hook Beacon" on Sandy Hook, New Jersey, and the triangulation point of the U. S. Geodetic survey known as the Oriental Hotel on Coney Island, New York; then southeasterly at right angles with the last mentioned line to the main sea.

Third. The monumental marks by which said boundary line shall be hereafter known and recognized are hereby declared to be as follows:

1. The "Great Beds Lighthouse."

2. A permanent monument marked "State Boundary Line, New York and New Jersey, " and to be placed at the intersection of the line drawn from the "Great Beds Lighthouse" to "Waackaack or Wilson's Beacon," Monmouth county, New Jersey, and the line drawn from "Morgan No. 2" triangulation point U. S. Coast and geodetic survey, in Middlesex county, New Jersey, to the "Roamer Stone Beacon."

3. Eight buoys or spindles to be marked like the permanent monument above mentioned, and placed at suitable intervening points along the line from the said permanent monument to the "Roamer Stone Beacon."

4. The "Roamer Stone Beacon."

Fourth. The maps accompanying and filed with this agreement, showing the location of the above described boundary line between the state of New York and the state of New Jersey in Raritan bay to the main sea, and of the monumental marks by which it is marked and to be marked, duly authenticated and attested by the signatures of the said commissioners, and placed on file in the offices of the secretaries of state of the respective states, shall constitute the permanent and authentic records of said boundary line, and are hereby adopted by the parties hereto, and made a part of this agreement. In witness whereof, the said commissioners have hereto set their hands and seals in duplicate, this twelfth day of October, in the year of our Lord 1887. M. W. HAZELTINE. [L. S.] GEO. H. COOK. [L. S.] ROBERT MOORE. [L. S.] ROB'T C. BACOT. [L. S.] G. C. HANUS, LIEUT. U. S. N. [L. S.] A. B. STONEY. [L. S.] Certified to EDWARD P. DOYLE, Secretary of Joint Commission.

An agreement made the twenty-third day of December, in the year eighteen hundred and eighty-nine, between Mayo W. Hazeltine, Robert Moore and Lieut. G. C. Hanus, U. S. N. , commissioners on the part of the state of New York, and Robert C. Bacot, William M. Oliver and Edwin A. Stevens, commissioners on the part of the state of New Jersey.

WHEREAS, By chapter 69, laws of 1887, the governor of the state of New York was authorized to appoint three commissioners with full power on the part of the state of New York, to meet with the commissioners appointed, or to be appointed, for a like purpose on the part of the state of New Jersey, and with them to locate and mark out by proper monuments and buoys the true boundary line between the two states in lands under water in Raritan bay; and

WHEREAS, The jurisdiction of the said commissioners was continued and extended by chapter 159, laws of 1888, and chapter 212, laws of 1889, so as to include the Arthur kill, Kill von Kull, New York bay and the Hudson river; and

WHEREAS, The said Mayo W. Hazeltine, Robert Moore and Lieut. G. C. Hanus, U. S. N. , were duly appointed commissioners on the part of the state of New York, for the purposes mentioned in said acts; and

WHEREAS, By an act of the legislature of the state of New Jersey, passed February 14, 1888, entitled, "A joint resolution authorizing the appointment of a commission to locate and mark out the boundary line between the state of New Jersey and the state of New York, in lands under water in the Arthur kill, Kill von Kull, New York bay and the Hudson river;" and

WHEREAS, George H. Cook, Robert C. Bacot and William M. Oliver were duly appointed commissioners for the purpose of said act; and

WHEREAS, George H. Cook having died, Edwin A. Stevens was appointed in his stead, clothed with the same powers; and

WHEREAS, The said commissioners acting for and on behalf of their respective states, have entered upon the performance of the duties imposed upon them by the said acts of their respective legislatures, and have, in pursuance of the authority to them severally given as aforesaid, agreed and hereby do agree upon a boundary line between the two states in lands under water in the Arthur kill, Kill von Kull, New York bay and the Hudson river, and do locate the same as follows:

First. Starting from a point (at the conclusion of the boundary line in Raritan bay) and marked for the purposes of this agreement, A.

This point is equidistant between the southwesterly corner of the dwelling-house of David C. Butler, at Ward's point, on Staten Island, in the state of New York, and the southeasterly corner of the brick building on the lands of Cortlandt L. Parker, at the intersection of the westerly line of water street with the northerly line of Lewis street, in Perth Amboy, in the state of New Jersey.

The line runs thence in a succession of straight lines through the Arthur kill, the Kill von Kull, New York bay and the Hudson river, to a point marked "JJ," for the purposes of this agreement.

This point "JJ," is at the extreme northern limit of the boundary line in lands under water, and from this point the line runs westerly to a rock which is described in the report of the New York and New Jersey boundary commission of 1883 as marking the eastern end of the boundary line between New York and New Jersey, as determined upon by the royal boundary commission of 1769.

The absolute geographical locations of the point at the place of beginning and the point of conclusion are as follows: POINT A (PLACE OF BEGINNING).

Latitude. Seconds in meters. Longitude. Seconds in meters (Latitude and longitude not given. Description sufficient.) POINT JJ (PLACE OF CONCLUSION). ________________________________________________________________________ Latitude. Seconds in meters. Longitude. Seconds in meters. ________________________________________________________________________ 40° 59' 49" 74 N. 1534.38 74° 53' 38" 57 W. 901.46 ________________________________________________________________________ The points at which changes of direction occur in the boundary line, from the place of beginning to the place of conclusion, are for the purposes of this agreement lettered or numbered, and their determination and absolute geographical positions are as follows: ________________________________________________________________________ LATITUDE. LONGITUDE. ________________________________________________________________________ Seconds Seconds in in Degrees. Minutes. Seconds. meters. Degrees.Minutes. Seconds. meters. ________________________________________________________________________

B 40 30 31 N. 956.2 74 15 30.74 W. 723.9

C 40 30 56 N. 1727.33 74 15 16.22 W. 382.

D 40 31 15.07 N. 464.8 74 14 47.15 W. 1109.9

E 40 32 31.9 N. 984. 74 15 02.5 W. 58.8

F 40 32 57.38 N. 1769.9 74 14 52.42 W. 1233.9

G 40 33 32.68 N. 1008. 74 13 54.57 W. 1284.

H 40 33 25.03 N. 772. 74 13 06.29 W. 148.

I 40 33 37.54 N. 1157.9 74 12 53.95 W. 1269.4

J 40 34 25.03 N. 772. 74 12 38. W. 893.7

K 40 35 16.12 N. 498. 74 12 27.55 W. 647.9

L 40 35 51.87 N. 1599.9 74 12 00. W. 0. No. 1 40 36 01. N. 30.8 74 12 00. W. 0. No. 2 40 36 21.45 N. 661.6 74 12 18.88 W. 443.9 No. 3 40 36 51.02 N. 1573.7 74 12 15.48 W. 363.9 No. 4 40 37 00. N. 0. 74 12 10.21 W. 240.

O 40 37 27.36 N. 844.1 74 12 15.61 W. 366.9

P 40 37 43.24 N. 1333.7 74 12 09.69 W. 227.9

R 40 37 53.36 N. 1645.9 74 12 10.12 W. 238.

S 40 38 04.86 N. 149.9 74 11 54.87 W. 1289.3 Position Center of Baltimore and Ohio Bridge Pier.

40 38 15.31 N. 472.3 74 11 47.97 W. 1125.9

A'40 38 30.92 N. 953.7 74 11 30.63 W. 719.8

B'40 38 45.38 N. 1399.8 74 11 09.79 W. 229.9

C'40 38 47.13 N. 1453.7 74 10 55.42 W. 1301.8

D'40 38 30.79 N. 949.7 74 08 36.68 W. 861.9

E'40 38 36.89 N. 1137.9 74 08 00. W. 0.0

F'40 38 31.37 N. 967.6 74 07 35.15 W. 825.8

G'40 38 52.66 N. 1624.3 74 06 36.94 W. 867.9

H'40 38 52.66 N. 1624.3 74 05 37.88 W. 889.8

I'40 39 05.05 N. 155.77 74 05 14.64 W. 343.09

J'40 39 04.94 N. 152.38 74 03 22.25 W. 522.65

K' or

AA 40 42 00. N. 0.0 74 01 36.50 W. 857.0

BB 40 43 04.68 N. 144.36 74 01 26.59 W. 624.07

CC 40 45 26.82 N. 827.30 74 00 52. W. 1219.66

DD 40 49 26.82 N. 1096.61 73 57 50.38 W. 1180.6

EE 40 51 03.62 N. 111.67 73 57 11.69 W. 273.78

FF 40 53 19.05 N. 587.64 73 55 48.77 W. 1141.7

GG 40 55 40.03 N. 1243.13 73 54 52.82 W. 1235.61

HH 40 56 48.22 N. 1487.48 73 54 33.35 W. 780.06

II 40 58 54.39 N. 1677.82 73 53 47.63 W. 1113.58

JJ 40 59 49.74 N. 1534.38 73 53 38.57 W. 901.46 ________________

Second. The monumental marks by which said boundary line shall hereafter be known and recognized have been carefully described, their absolute geographical positions given, and this description and location will be filed in the office of the secretary of state of New York and the secretary of state of New Jersey.

Third. The maps accompanying and filed with this agreement, showing the location of the above-mentioned boundary line between the state of New York and the state of New Jersey in lands under water in Arthur kill, Kill von Kull, New York bay and the Hudson river, and of the monumental marks by which such line may be distinguished and known, duly authenticated and attested by the signatures of the aforesaid commissioners, and placed on file in the offices of the secretaries of state of the respective states, shall constitute the permanent and authenticated record of said boundary line, and are hereby adopted by the parties hereto and made part of this agreement.

In witness whereof, the said commissioners have hereto set their hands and seals in duplicate, this twenty-third day of December, in the year of our Lord eighteen hundred and eighty-nine. M. W. HAZELTINE. [L. S.] ROBERT MOORE. [L. S.] G. C. HANUS. [L. S.] R. C. BACOT. [L. S.] W. M. OLIVER. [L. S.] E. A. STEVENS. [L. S.] Attest: EDWARD P. DOYLE, Secretary Joint Boundary Commission.

Section 7-A. Jurisdiction and ownership of offshore waters and lands thereunder.

1. The jurisdiction of this state shall extend to and over, and be exercisable with respect to, waters offshore from the coasts of this state as follows:

(a) Those portions of the Great Lakes lying within the territorial limits of this state.

(b) The marginal sea to a line three geographical miles distant from the coast line and to any other line farther seaward therefrom hereinafter defined or recognized by the United States of America by international treaty or otherwise.

(c) The high seas to whatever extent jurisdiction therein may be claimed by the United States of America, or to whatever extent may be recognized by the usages and customs of international law or by any agreement, international or otherwise, to which the United States of America or this state may be party.

(d) all submerged lands, including the subsurface thereof, lying under said aforementioned waters.

2. The ownership of the waters and subsurface lands enumerated or described in subdivision one of this section shall be in this state unless it shall be, with respect to any given parcel or area, in any other person or entity by virtue of a valid and effective instrument of conveyance or by operation of law.

3. Nothing contained herein shall be construed to limit or restrict in any way (1) the jurisdiction of this state over any person or with respect to any subject within or without the state which jurisdiction is exercisable by reason of citizenship, residence or for any other reason recognized by law; (2) jurisdiction or ownership of or over any other waters or lands thereunder, within or forming part of the boundaries of this state. Nor shall anything herein be construed to impair the exercise of legislative jurisdiction by the United States of America over any area to which such jurisdiction has been validly ceded by this state and which remains in the ownership of the United States of America.

Section 8. Maintenance of monuments.

The commissioner of transportation, in cooperation with persons duly authorized by the adjoining state, shall cause the monuments erected, or to be erected, as boundaries of the state, to be maintained, and cause suitable monuments to be set wherever such are now lacking at the points where such state boundary is intersected by the boundary of any towns or counties of this state, or by any highway.

Section 9. Saving clause.

This article shall not be construed as a relinquishment by the state of New York of any territory to which it now has title, or over which it now has jurisdiction.

Section 10. Defense of state sovereignty and jurisdiction.

The governor shall, at the expense of the state, employ counsel and provide for the defense of any action or proceeding, instituted against the state, or against any person deriving title therefrom, to recover any lands within the state, under pretence of any claim inconsistent with its sovereignty and jurisdiction.